Traditional recipes

In Season Now: Taking Advantage of July Produce

In Season Now: Taking Advantage of July Produce


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There is a big world of food out there, so why do we eat the same thing all year round?

Marinated Zucchini Chicken Salad With Marcona Almonds

We live in a world where we can eat almost anything we want, whenever we want. Avocados on everything all the time? Sure thing.

While this is extremely convenient, it also allows us to stay safe within our cooking and eating comfort zones. There is a big world of produce out there, so why do we eat the same thing all year round?

A great way to grocery shop is to head to the market without a shopping list and be inspired by what looks the most tantalizing. Maybe risk it all and cook with an ingredient you’ve never touched before. Your local farmer’s market takes out all the guesswork and provides you with in-season produce specific your locale.

Buying local and seasonal products is not only more environmentally friendly it is also more economical for buyer and producer alike! Food doesn’t need to travel around the world and its simple economics: when there is an abundance of an item, prices drop. Best of all, when we shop and cook seasonally, ingredients are at their most flavorful.

Visit the Pick Your Own website for specific seasonality charts tailored to your state, but in general here is some of what July has in store for us:

Fruit:

Vegetables:

Seafood:


Season's eatings: pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes

G rey ghost and pine mushrooms both grow in the soft bed of pine needles on the pine forest floor. Grey ghosts are quite rare and pine mushrooms are much more readily available. Look for them in specialty grocers and from farmer’s markets, or – if you have the foraging skills – in the forest itself.

They are very seasonal, relying on the right conditions: a bit of soft autumn rain, a sunny morning. In this era of everything being available all the time, it makes them special.

Pine mushrooms are delicate. Make sure to treat them gently. It's best to keep them all in one layer, with some soft paper between them, rather than thrown together in a bag as you do with regular mushrooms.

They have the most wonderful, earthy colour, with beautiful orange gills. The little ones have a more delicate flavour, but I love how you can cut the bigger ones into meaty slabs.

This recipe can be made with a collection of delicious mushrooms, not just pine. We used grey ghosts and pine mushrooms because a friend was kind enough to give us a box of them, but swiss browns would be lovely, as would an Asian mushroom or two the long strings of enoki would make a delicious addition.

The recipe is not about being fussy, but instead taking advantage of what’s in season and available right now.

The seasonal ingredients for pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes. Photograph: Lauren Bamford Photograph: Lauren Bamford

Earthy colours and earthy flavours. I love how nutty the buckwheat crepes are, enfolding the rich mess of mushrooms.

We served this for breakfast. It’s a great way to step out of the poached egg routine of most breakfasts, although I wouldn't say no to an almost-hard-boiled egg, split open and oozing alongside the crepe. It would make a lovely light dinner as well.


Season's eatings: pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes

G rey ghost and pine mushrooms both grow in the soft bed of pine needles on the pine forest floor. Grey ghosts are quite rare and pine mushrooms are much more readily available. Look for them in specialty grocers and from farmer’s markets, or – if you have the foraging skills – in the forest itself.

They are very seasonal, relying on the right conditions: a bit of soft autumn rain, a sunny morning. In this era of everything being available all the time, it makes them special.

Pine mushrooms are delicate. Make sure to treat them gently. It's best to keep them all in one layer, with some soft paper between them, rather than thrown together in a bag as you do with regular mushrooms.

They have the most wonderful, earthy colour, with beautiful orange gills. The little ones have a more delicate flavour, but I love how you can cut the bigger ones into meaty slabs.

This recipe can be made with a collection of delicious mushrooms, not just pine. We used grey ghosts and pine mushrooms because a friend was kind enough to give us a box of them, but swiss browns would be lovely, as would an Asian mushroom or two the long strings of enoki would make a delicious addition.

The recipe is not about being fussy, but instead taking advantage of what’s in season and available right now.

The seasonal ingredients for pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes. Photograph: Lauren Bamford Photograph: Lauren Bamford

Earthy colours and earthy flavours. I love how nutty the buckwheat crepes are, enfolding the rich mess of mushrooms.

We served this for breakfast. It’s a great way to step out of the poached egg routine of most breakfasts, although I wouldn't say no to an almost-hard-boiled egg, split open and oozing alongside the crepe. It would make a lovely light dinner as well.


Season's eatings: pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes

G rey ghost and pine mushrooms both grow in the soft bed of pine needles on the pine forest floor. Grey ghosts are quite rare and pine mushrooms are much more readily available. Look for them in specialty grocers and from farmer’s markets, or – if you have the foraging skills – in the forest itself.

They are very seasonal, relying on the right conditions: a bit of soft autumn rain, a sunny morning. In this era of everything being available all the time, it makes them special.

Pine mushrooms are delicate. Make sure to treat them gently. It's best to keep them all in one layer, with some soft paper between them, rather than thrown together in a bag as you do with regular mushrooms.

They have the most wonderful, earthy colour, with beautiful orange gills. The little ones have a more delicate flavour, but I love how you can cut the bigger ones into meaty slabs.

This recipe can be made with a collection of delicious mushrooms, not just pine. We used grey ghosts and pine mushrooms because a friend was kind enough to give us a box of them, but swiss browns would be lovely, as would an Asian mushroom or two the long strings of enoki would make a delicious addition.

The recipe is not about being fussy, but instead taking advantage of what’s in season and available right now.

The seasonal ingredients for pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes. Photograph: Lauren Bamford Photograph: Lauren Bamford

Earthy colours and earthy flavours. I love how nutty the buckwheat crepes are, enfolding the rich mess of mushrooms.

We served this for breakfast. It’s a great way to step out of the poached egg routine of most breakfasts, although I wouldn't say no to an almost-hard-boiled egg, split open and oozing alongside the crepe. It would make a lovely light dinner as well.


Season's eatings: pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes

G rey ghost and pine mushrooms both grow in the soft bed of pine needles on the pine forest floor. Grey ghosts are quite rare and pine mushrooms are much more readily available. Look for them in specialty grocers and from farmer’s markets, or – if you have the foraging skills – in the forest itself.

They are very seasonal, relying on the right conditions: a bit of soft autumn rain, a sunny morning. In this era of everything being available all the time, it makes them special.

Pine mushrooms are delicate. Make sure to treat them gently. It's best to keep them all in one layer, with some soft paper between them, rather than thrown together in a bag as you do with regular mushrooms.

They have the most wonderful, earthy colour, with beautiful orange gills. The little ones have a more delicate flavour, but I love how you can cut the bigger ones into meaty slabs.

This recipe can be made with a collection of delicious mushrooms, not just pine. We used grey ghosts and pine mushrooms because a friend was kind enough to give us a box of them, but swiss browns would be lovely, as would an Asian mushroom or two the long strings of enoki would make a delicious addition.

The recipe is not about being fussy, but instead taking advantage of what’s in season and available right now.

The seasonal ingredients for pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes. Photograph: Lauren Bamford Photograph: Lauren Bamford

Earthy colours and earthy flavours. I love how nutty the buckwheat crepes are, enfolding the rich mess of mushrooms.

We served this for breakfast. It’s a great way to step out of the poached egg routine of most breakfasts, although I wouldn't say no to an almost-hard-boiled egg, split open and oozing alongside the crepe. It would make a lovely light dinner as well.


Season's eatings: pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes

G rey ghost and pine mushrooms both grow in the soft bed of pine needles on the pine forest floor. Grey ghosts are quite rare and pine mushrooms are much more readily available. Look for them in specialty grocers and from farmer’s markets, or – if you have the foraging skills – in the forest itself.

They are very seasonal, relying on the right conditions: a bit of soft autumn rain, a sunny morning. In this era of everything being available all the time, it makes them special.

Pine mushrooms are delicate. Make sure to treat them gently. It's best to keep them all in one layer, with some soft paper between them, rather than thrown together in a bag as you do with regular mushrooms.

They have the most wonderful, earthy colour, with beautiful orange gills. The little ones have a more delicate flavour, but I love how you can cut the bigger ones into meaty slabs.

This recipe can be made with a collection of delicious mushrooms, not just pine. We used grey ghosts and pine mushrooms because a friend was kind enough to give us a box of them, but swiss browns would be lovely, as would an Asian mushroom or two the long strings of enoki would make a delicious addition.

The recipe is not about being fussy, but instead taking advantage of what’s in season and available right now.

The seasonal ingredients for pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes. Photograph: Lauren Bamford Photograph: Lauren Bamford

Earthy colours and earthy flavours. I love how nutty the buckwheat crepes are, enfolding the rich mess of mushrooms.

We served this for breakfast. It’s a great way to step out of the poached egg routine of most breakfasts, although I wouldn't say no to an almost-hard-boiled egg, split open and oozing alongside the crepe. It would make a lovely light dinner as well.


Season's eatings: pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes

G rey ghost and pine mushrooms both grow in the soft bed of pine needles on the pine forest floor. Grey ghosts are quite rare and pine mushrooms are much more readily available. Look for them in specialty grocers and from farmer’s markets, or – if you have the foraging skills – in the forest itself.

They are very seasonal, relying on the right conditions: a bit of soft autumn rain, a sunny morning. In this era of everything being available all the time, it makes them special.

Pine mushrooms are delicate. Make sure to treat them gently. It's best to keep them all in one layer, with some soft paper between them, rather than thrown together in a bag as you do with regular mushrooms.

They have the most wonderful, earthy colour, with beautiful orange gills. The little ones have a more delicate flavour, but I love how you can cut the bigger ones into meaty slabs.

This recipe can be made with a collection of delicious mushrooms, not just pine. We used grey ghosts and pine mushrooms because a friend was kind enough to give us a box of them, but swiss browns would be lovely, as would an Asian mushroom or two the long strings of enoki would make a delicious addition.

The recipe is not about being fussy, but instead taking advantage of what’s in season and available right now.

The seasonal ingredients for pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes. Photograph: Lauren Bamford Photograph: Lauren Bamford

Earthy colours and earthy flavours. I love how nutty the buckwheat crepes are, enfolding the rich mess of mushrooms.

We served this for breakfast. It’s a great way to step out of the poached egg routine of most breakfasts, although I wouldn't say no to an almost-hard-boiled egg, split open and oozing alongside the crepe. It would make a lovely light dinner as well.


Season's eatings: pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes

G rey ghost and pine mushrooms both grow in the soft bed of pine needles on the pine forest floor. Grey ghosts are quite rare and pine mushrooms are much more readily available. Look for them in specialty grocers and from farmer’s markets, or – if you have the foraging skills – in the forest itself.

They are very seasonal, relying on the right conditions: a bit of soft autumn rain, a sunny morning. In this era of everything being available all the time, it makes them special.

Pine mushrooms are delicate. Make sure to treat them gently. It's best to keep them all in one layer, with some soft paper between them, rather than thrown together in a bag as you do with regular mushrooms.

They have the most wonderful, earthy colour, with beautiful orange gills. The little ones have a more delicate flavour, but I love how you can cut the bigger ones into meaty slabs.

This recipe can be made with a collection of delicious mushrooms, not just pine. We used grey ghosts and pine mushrooms because a friend was kind enough to give us a box of them, but swiss browns would be lovely, as would an Asian mushroom or two the long strings of enoki would make a delicious addition.

The recipe is not about being fussy, but instead taking advantage of what’s in season and available right now.

The seasonal ingredients for pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes. Photograph: Lauren Bamford Photograph: Lauren Bamford

Earthy colours and earthy flavours. I love how nutty the buckwheat crepes are, enfolding the rich mess of mushrooms.

We served this for breakfast. It’s a great way to step out of the poached egg routine of most breakfasts, although I wouldn't say no to an almost-hard-boiled egg, split open and oozing alongside the crepe. It would make a lovely light dinner as well.


Season's eatings: pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes

G rey ghost and pine mushrooms both grow in the soft bed of pine needles on the pine forest floor. Grey ghosts are quite rare and pine mushrooms are much more readily available. Look for them in specialty grocers and from farmer’s markets, or – if you have the foraging skills – in the forest itself.

They are very seasonal, relying on the right conditions: a bit of soft autumn rain, a sunny morning. In this era of everything being available all the time, it makes them special.

Pine mushrooms are delicate. Make sure to treat them gently. It's best to keep them all in one layer, with some soft paper between them, rather than thrown together in a bag as you do with regular mushrooms.

They have the most wonderful, earthy colour, with beautiful orange gills. The little ones have a more delicate flavour, but I love how you can cut the bigger ones into meaty slabs.

This recipe can be made with a collection of delicious mushrooms, not just pine. We used grey ghosts and pine mushrooms because a friend was kind enough to give us a box of them, but swiss browns would be lovely, as would an Asian mushroom or two the long strings of enoki would make a delicious addition.

The recipe is not about being fussy, but instead taking advantage of what’s in season and available right now.

The seasonal ingredients for pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes. Photograph: Lauren Bamford Photograph: Lauren Bamford

Earthy colours and earthy flavours. I love how nutty the buckwheat crepes are, enfolding the rich mess of mushrooms.

We served this for breakfast. It’s a great way to step out of the poached egg routine of most breakfasts, although I wouldn't say no to an almost-hard-boiled egg, split open and oozing alongside the crepe. It would make a lovely light dinner as well.


Season's eatings: pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes

G rey ghost and pine mushrooms both grow in the soft bed of pine needles on the pine forest floor. Grey ghosts are quite rare and pine mushrooms are much more readily available. Look for them in specialty grocers and from farmer’s markets, or – if you have the foraging skills – in the forest itself.

They are very seasonal, relying on the right conditions: a bit of soft autumn rain, a sunny morning. In this era of everything being available all the time, it makes them special.

Pine mushrooms are delicate. Make sure to treat them gently. It's best to keep them all in one layer, with some soft paper between them, rather than thrown together in a bag as you do with regular mushrooms.

They have the most wonderful, earthy colour, with beautiful orange gills. The little ones have a more delicate flavour, but I love how you can cut the bigger ones into meaty slabs.

This recipe can be made with a collection of delicious mushrooms, not just pine. We used grey ghosts and pine mushrooms because a friend was kind enough to give us a box of them, but swiss browns would be lovely, as would an Asian mushroom or two the long strings of enoki would make a delicious addition.

The recipe is not about being fussy, but instead taking advantage of what’s in season and available right now.

The seasonal ingredients for pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes. Photograph: Lauren Bamford Photograph: Lauren Bamford

Earthy colours and earthy flavours. I love how nutty the buckwheat crepes are, enfolding the rich mess of mushrooms.

We served this for breakfast. It’s a great way to step out of the poached egg routine of most breakfasts, although I wouldn't say no to an almost-hard-boiled egg, split open and oozing alongside the crepe. It would make a lovely light dinner as well.


Season's eatings: pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes

G rey ghost and pine mushrooms both grow in the soft bed of pine needles on the pine forest floor. Grey ghosts are quite rare and pine mushrooms are much more readily available. Look for them in specialty grocers and from farmer’s markets, or – if you have the foraging skills – in the forest itself.

They are very seasonal, relying on the right conditions: a bit of soft autumn rain, a sunny morning. In this era of everything being available all the time, it makes them special.

Pine mushrooms are delicate. Make sure to treat them gently. It's best to keep them all in one layer, with some soft paper between them, rather than thrown together in a bag as you do with regular mushrooms.

They have the most wonderful, earthy colour, with beautiful orange gills. The little ones have a more delicate flavour, but I love how you can cut the bigger ones into meaty slabs.

This recipe can be made with a collection of delicious mushrooms, not just pine. We used grey ghosts and pine mushrooms because a friend was kind enough to give us a box of them, but swiss browns would be lovely, as would an Asian mushroom or two the long strings of enoki would make a delicious addition.

The recipe is not about being fussy, but instead taking advantage of what’s in season and available right now.

The seasonal ingredients for pine mushrooms with buckwheat crepes. Photograph: Lauren Bamford Photograph: Lauren Bamford

Earthy colours and earthy flavours. I love how nutty the buckwheat crepes are, enfolding the rich mess of mushrooms.

We served this for breakfast. It’s a great way to step out of the poached egg routine of most breakfasts, although I wouldn't say no to an almost-hard-boiled egg, split open and oozing alongside the crepe. It would make a lovely light dinner as well.